Training

Phishing to Laundering: From Clicks to Cash-Out

It is widely acknowledged that phishing is responsible for more than 90 percent of breaches occurring today. Basic phishing primarily exploits human behavior to entice a victim to ‘click the link’ or ‘open the attachment,’ thus often handing over to the criminal the golden nugget – valid access credentials. While we are all taught not to click or open the attachment, the scheme is still highly successful and profitable.

CGIC 2019 Solicitation Informational Webinar

The Bureau of Justice Assistance and the National Resource and Technical Assistance Center team will provide an overview of the 2019 Crime Gun Intelligence Center (CGIC) Solicitation. This webinar will review eligibility, program essential elements, roles and responsibilities of a CGIC, and much more. The solicitation can be found here: https://www.bja.gov/funding/CGIC19.pdf.

Webinar Date and Time: Thursday, May 16, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. ET.

Two-Day Suicide Prevention Training for Crime Victim Advocates (May 2019)

The Education Development Center is offering a series of suicide prevention train-the-trainer courses designed specifically for crime victim advocates who are not clinical mental health professionals. With funding support from the Office for Victims of Crime, the Center developed the HOPE curriculum (Notice Hints, Ask Openly About Suicide, Validate Pain, and Explore Reasons to Live).

IA105 Intelligence Writing and Briefing (May 2019)

This course covers basic intelligence writing and briefing principles, as well as methods to facilitate increased intelligence sharing. Topics include creative/critical thinking and critical reading skills, source evaluation, privacy and civil rights, intelligence product writing structure and style, and creating and presenting intelligence briefings. An instructor and peer feedback process is applied to the reports and briefings produced in class.

FC102 Financial Investigations Triage (Aug 2019, Tennessee)

This course provides an overview of the actions investigators can take at the outset of a financial crime investigation. Students learn to ask critical questions, gather documentation, and analyze information for leads. Topics include obtaining and working with financial records, red flags in financial cases, money laundering, investigative strategies for different types of financial crimes, and commingled funds.

CI102 Basic Cyber Investigations: Dark Web & Open Source Intelligence (Aug 2019, Maryland)

This course provides expert guidance in the skills law enforcement officers need to conduct successful online investigations. Topics include IP addresses and domains, an overview of currently popular social media platforms, best practices for building an undercover profile, foundational knowledge related to the dark web, and the use of the dark web as an investigative tool. Instructors demonstrate both open source and commercially available investigative tools for social engineering, information gathering, and artifacts related to social media, as well as automated utilities to capture information and crawl websites. 

DF102 Basic Digital Forensic Analysis: Previewing (Aug 2019, New Hampshire)

This course provides the fundamental knowledge and skills necessary to preview the most commonly encountered forms of digital evidence. The course covers Windows-based and macOS-based computers, mobile devices, and removable storage media. In a combination of lecture, discussion, and practical exercises, instructors introduce the previewing process, legal considerations, live previewing, and dead-box previewing. Students gain hands-on experience with free and commercial third-party previewing tools that are in current use by practitioners in the field.

CI240 Intermediate Cyber Investigations: Virtual Currency (Aug 2019, Maryland)

This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge and skills they need to investigate crimes involving virtual currency. Instructors explain foundational concepts like the characteristics of money, virtual currency, and cryptocurrency. Blockchain technology, proof work, and proof of stake are covered, and students learn how industry-leading cryptocurrencies (Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Monero) work and how they differ from each other. Finally, students learn investigative techniques for tracking and documenting transactions and best practices for seizing and securing cryptocurrency.

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