Training

DF320 Advanced Digital Forensic Analysis: macOS

This course prepares students to identify various artifacts typically located in property lists and SQLite databases on MacOS-based computers, as well as learn how to perform forensic analysis. Students gain hands-on practical experience writing basic SQL queries and using to analyze operating system artifacts that includes, but is not limited to, user login passwords, FaceTime, messages, mail, contacts, calendars, reminders, notes, photos, Safari, Google Chrome, and Mozilla Firefox.

Prosecuting Professional Fraud: Investigative Case Studies

When the target of an investigation is a professional, like a doctor or lawyer, it can complicate the case. It can be even more complex when the target is pretending to be a professional. During the course of the investigation, you may have to navigate subpoena productions around privileges like the attorney client privilege or HIPPA. We will highlight some of the thorny issues that can arise during these investigations and discuss how certain strategies can positively impact your case by examining several case studies.

FC105 Financial Records Examination and Analysis

This course covers the acquisition, examination, and analysis of many types of financial records, including bank statements and checks, wire transfer records, and business records. Topics include recognizing and investigating common indicators of fraud, using spreadsheets to facilitate analysis and pattern recognition, and financial profiling. There is a strong focus on presenting financial evidence in multiple modalities: spreadsheet data outputs, graphic representations, and written/oral presentations.

*Introduction to analysis. Best practices. Finding patterns. Indicators of fraud. Presenting your findings.
*Financial records. Bank records. Business documents.
*Financial profiling. Methods of profiling. Reasons to create a profile. Creating a profile.
*Hands-on experience. Work a mock financial case as part of an investigative team.

FC201 Financial Records Investigative Skills

This course builds on the concepts introduced in FC101 (FIPS) and FC105 (FREA), introducing investigators and prosecutors to emerging issues in financial crime. Topics include money laundering, analyzing large financial data sets, conducting effective interviews, and managing large amounts of financial evidence. This course consists of a mix of lecture, discussion, and hands-on exercises. Students conduct a mock investigation that includes interviews, data analysis, and the examination of various documents.

*Money laundering. Methods of laundering money. Tracing illegal funds. Emerging issues. FinCEN.
*Spreadsheeting skills. Spreadsheet architecture. Formulas and calculations. Pivot tables.
*Working with financial data. Benfords law analysis. Disentangling commingled funds.
*Hands-on experience. Work a mock financial case as part of an investigative team.

DF201 Intermediate Digital Forensic Analysis: Automated Forensic Tools

This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge and skills necessary to perform a limited digital forensic examination, validate hardware and software tools, and effectively use digital forensic suites and specialized tools. The course begins with a detailed study of the digital forensic examination process, including documentation, case management, evidence handling, validation, and virtualization. Students learn to use todays leading commercial and open source digital forensic suites: Magnet Axiom, X-ways Forensic, and Autopsy. Instruction on each suite will include an interface overview, configuration, hashing, file signature analysis, keyword searching, data carving, bookmarking, and report creation.

*Digital forensic process. Evidence review; requests for examination; case management.
*Validation. Creation of validation images; validation testing.
*Effective tool usage. Tool interface; hashing; file signature analysis; data carving; searching; metadata; bookmarking.
*Reporting. General report structure; report templates; using tool-generated reports.

DF330 Advanced Digital Forensic Analysis: iOS & Android

This course provides the advanced skills and knowledge necessary to analyze data on iOS devices (iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad) and Android devices at an advanced level. Students use forensically-sound tools and techniques to analyze potential evidence, employing advanced techniques to uncover evidence potentially missed or misrepresented by commercial forensic tools. Topics include identifying potential threats to data stored on devices, available acquisition options, accessing locked devices, and the default folder structure. Core skills include analyzing artifacts such as device information, call history, voicemail, messages, web browser history, contacts, and photos. Instruction is provided on developing the hunt methodology for analyzing third party applications not supported by commercial forensic tools.

Mobile device hardware fundamentals. How mobile devices work, store data, and interact with a variety of networks.
Device handling. Properly preserving data for imaging and analysis. Identifying potential threats to data integrity.
Device acquisition and security. Acquisition options (physical, logical, device backups). Bypassing passcodes and properly defeating encrypted backups of iOS devices.
Advanced analysis techniques. Mounting images, partitioning scheme and default folder structure, types of artifacts (plists, SQLite databases, etc.).

Investigative Communication with Witnesses & Subjects

On-scene interviews are vital for developing and triaging information that will be needed to gain information and evidence for your investigation. While there is always attention placed on custodial interviews and the confession, the information obtained on-scene can save you time and make your investigations more efficient. This webinar will focus on the ability for you to relate to and influence witnesses to communicate more effectively for your investigation, no matter what type of investigation.

Overview of IoT for Investigators and Examiners: What's in Your Toolkit?

Join us to explore IoT through the optics of the investigator and the examiner. Let us examine the most popular IoT technology, essential planning in any case, how to identify and search for relevant technologies at search or crime scenes, what digital evidence is available locally versus remotely, what tools are available to assist in collection and analysis, what should you know about IoT related legal process, and where to obtain additional resources, focused training, and technical assistance. Those who attend will gain a better understanding of both the challenges presented by IoT to investigators and examiners as well as available resources and solutions.

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