Training

Work-Life Balance: Identifying Ways to Enhance Communication During the Holidays

This webinar will unpack some of the challenges first responder families face during the holiday season. Dr. Craw will share her experiences as the daughter of a police officer, and Elizabeth Strong will discuss her perspectives as a 911 dispatcher. Together, they will provide insight into how families can enhance communication to address concerns about missing time together, feeling detached, and having difficulty transitioning home during the holidays. The speakers will also highlight ways families can avoid adverse outcomes of managing work-life balance, such as guilt, stress, or tension.

Presented by:
Dr. Erin Craw, Ph.D., Director of Research, Lighthouse Health and Wellness
Elizabeth Strong, Wellness and Mental Health Initiatives, NW3C

NLERSP Executive Workshop (In Person) - Richmond Heights PD/ MAGLOCLEN

Lead your agency in roadway safety. Attend this 4-hour workshop with other mid-level and executive-level officers where you will discuss policies, training, and technological innovations that can reduce the risk of officer-involved collisions and struck-by incidents. The course provides an overview of available research about the risk factors for officer-involved collisions and struck-by incidents, and it identifies a variety of interventions and technological innovations that can reduce the likelihood of their occurrence.

FC105 Financial Records Examination and Analysis

This course covers the acquisition, examination, and analysis of many types of financial records, including bank statements and checks, wire transfer records, and business records. Topics include recognizing and investigating common indicators of fraud, using spreadsheets to facilitate analysis and pattern recognition, and financial profiling. There is a strong focus on presenting financial evidence in multiple modalities: spreadsheet data outputs, graphic representations, and written/oral presentations.

*Introduction to analysis. Best practices. Finding patterns. Indicators of fraud. Presenting your findings.
*Financial records. Bank records. Business documents.
*Financial profiling. Methods of profiling. Reasons to create a profile. Creating a profile.
*Hands-on experience. Work a mock financial case as part of an investigative team.

DF201 Intermediate Digital Forensic Analysis: Automated Forensic Tools

This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge and skills necessary to perform a limited digital forensic examination, validate hardware and software tools, and effectively use digital forensic suites and specialized tools. The course begins with a detailed study of the digital forensic examination process, including documentation, case management, evidence handling, validation, and virtualization. Students learn to use todays leading commercial and open source digital forensic suites: Magnet Axiom, X-ways Forensic, and Autopsy. Instruction on each suite will include an interface overview, configuration, hashing, file signature analysis, keyword searching, data carving, bookmarking, and report creation.

*Digital forensic process. Evidence review; requests for examination; case management.
*Validation. Creation of validation images; validation testing.
*Effective tool usage. Tool interface; hashing; file signature analysis; data carving; searching; metadata; bookmarking.
*Reporting. General report structure; report templates; using tool-generated reports.

FC204 Combating Transnational Crime & Terrorism Financing

An effective financial investigation can disrupt terrorism organizations and interrupt, deter, or even stop operational terrorism activities before they can begin. In this three-day course, students develop an understanding of how financial systems are used to support terrorism activities and transnational criminal organizations. Students will work with tools and methods to investigate the manipulation of financial, communication, and business systems used for illicit purposes. Students will learn how to work with suspicious activity reports, crucial financial records such as Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications (SWIFT) messaging, and records used in banking and money services businesses. They will also learn how to gather information and evidence on other means of value transfer methods associated with money laundering, the black-market peso and forms of trade-based money laundering, hawala, and other alternate remittance systems, and virtual assets (cryptocurrency).

FC122 Intellectual Property Theft Training

This course introduces the problem of intellectual property theft and provides tools, techniques, and resources for investigating and prosecuting these crimes. A combination of lecture, discussion, and interactive exercises illustrates the potential dangers and economic repercussions of counterfeit products, as well as best practices and techniques for investigating IP theft. Students are provided with a state-specific folder that includes relevant statutes, sample organizational documents for IP investigations, and additional resources for investigators and prosecutors.

This course is presented in collaboration with the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG).
Awareness. Types of IP crimes. The criminals who commit these crimes. Impacts and dangers.
Investigation. Online and traditional techniques. Working with brand experts and the private sector. Large amounts of evidence. Resources.
Statutes. Prosecutorial theories. State-specific discussion.
Hands-on experience. Work with real counterfeit products. Identify fakes with expert guidance.

FC201 Financial Records Investigative Skills

This course builds on the concepts introduced in FC101 (FIPS) and FC105 (FREA), introducing investigators and prosecutors to emerging issues in financial crime. Topics include money laundering, analyzing large financial data sets, conducting effective interviews, and managing large amounts of financial evidence. This course consists of a mix of lecture, discussion, and hands-on exercises. Students conduct a mock investigation that includes interviews, data analysis, and the examination of various documents.

*Money laundering. Methods of laundering money. Tracing illegal funds. Emerging issues. FinCEN.
*Spreadsheeting skills. Spreadsheet architecture. Formulas and calculations. Pivot tables.
*Working with financial data. Benfords law analysis. Disentangling commingled funds.
*Hands-on experience. Work a mock financial case as part of an investigative team.

DF205 Intermediate Digital Forensic Analysis: SQLite Primer

Mobile devices dominate the intake list, and the desks of most digital forensics analyst globally. Devices are becoming more secure, with an increase in security the need for detailed analysis is increasing as well. SQLite is a self-contained, serverless database engine. It is found on nearly every operating system and dominates iOS, Android, and macOS as one of the most prevalent and relevant data storage mechanisms. Rather than hope our forensic tools support the newest applications or be tethered to how a certain utility parses data we can arm ourselves with the skills and techniques needed to conquer the analysis of nearly any application.

What is SQLite and how to identify and analyze logically
Recognizing relevant locations of valuable data within SQLite database.
Develop skills needed for crafting custom SQLite queries.
Learn how to recognize and decode a variety of common timestamp formats.
Learn how to perform SQLite analysis with automation.

DF100 Basic Digital Forensic Analysis: Seizure

This course introduces the information and techniques law enforcement personnel need to safely and methodically collect and preserve digital evidence at a crime scene. Topics include recognizing potential sources of digital evidence; planning and executing a digital evidence-based seizure; and the preservation, packaging, documentation, and transfer of digital evidence.

*Prepare. Prepare to respond to an incident or crime scene where digital evidence may be present.
*Identify. Learn tow to identify relevant sources of digital evidence in an ever-evolving landscape.
*Collect. Learn the proper methods of digital evidence collection.
*Preserve. Build upon the three previous principles to ensure valid and legal preservation of digital evidence can occur.

IA105 Intelligence Writing and Briefing

This course covers basic intelligence writing and briefing principles as well as methods for effective and clear intelligence sharing. Topics covered include creative and critical thinking, critical reading skills, source evaluation, privacy and civil rights, intelligence writing style and structure, and generating and presenting intelligence briefings. With guidance from experienced experts, students gain hands-on experience by working through data sets based on real cases to produce intelligence products. Instructors and peers provide feedback on briefings and reports produced and presented in class.

*Foundational skills. Creative thinking. Critical thinking. Critical reading.
*Information sources. Identify sources of intelligence information. Evaluate sources for validity and reliability.
*Analytical reports. Develop a structured and actionable analytical report based on a data set given in class.
*Privacy considerations. Ensure protection of privacy and civil rights while producing intelligence products.
*Briefings. Construct and deliver an intelligence briefing based on a data set given in class.

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