Corrections Professionals

The First Steps to Applying, Prepare Now

This is the second webinar in a four-part series preparing applicants for Bureau of Justice Assistance funding opportunities. Prior to the release of a solicitation, there are a number of steps that applicants can take. In this webinar, attendees will learn what registrations are necessary to apply, how to navigate Grants.gov, and what resources are available for applicants, such as the Office of Justice Programs’ Funding Resource Center. A question-and-answer session will follow at the end.

Funding Opportunities for Your Community in 2019 - An Overview of What’s Ahead

This webinar is the first in a series of four that will help prospective applicants find funding opportunities that address their needs. In this webinar, attendees will learn about the primary initiatives the Bureau of Justice Assistance plans to fund in fiscal year 2019, eligibility requirements, and estimated funding amounts. A question-and-answer session will follow at the end.

A Duty to Protect: Mental Health Care to the Incarcerated

U.S. jails are experiencing a crisis in managing and treating inmates with mental illness. This seminar will discuss the legal requirements regarding the "Duty to Protect," as well as the key protocols every jail should have in place, to include screening tools, heightened watch protocols, housing, and programming considerations.   

FY 2018 Justice Reinvestment Initiative: Funding Opportunities for State, Local, and Tribal Agencies and TTA Providers

This webinar will introduce the fiscal year 2018 funding opportunities offered through two solicitations, including a new grant program that provides direct assistance for state, local, and tribal justice agencies and jurisdictions to develop, implement, and test data-driven and evidence-based responses to high-cost drivers of crime and other compelling public safety challenges. The presenters will also discuss the related funding opportunity available to training and technical assistance providers.

National Center for Victims of Crime

The National Center for Victims of Crime (NCFVOC) is a nonprofit organization that advocates for victims' rights, trains professionals who work with victims, and serves as a trusted source of information on victims' issues. After more than 25 years, NCFVOC remains the most comprehensive national resource committed to advancing victims' rights and helping victims of crime rebuild their lives.

Active BJA Funded Project(s):

  • Project Safe Neighborhoods National Training and Technical Assistance Program

Webinar - Introducing the Public Safety Risk Assessment Clearinghouse

The Public Safety Risk Assessment Clearinghouse (PSRAC), developed in partnership between the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance and the Urban Institute’s Justice Policy Center (Urban), is a new, one-stop online resource for comprehensive and accessible information on risk assessment for safer communities.

Webinar - SOAR: A Reentry Tool for Individuals Involved in the Criminal Justice System

The Social Security Administration disability benefit programs – Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) – can provide income and health insurance benefits to support healthy return to communities for previously incarcerated individuals who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness and have a serious mental illness, medical impairment, and/or a co-occurring substance use disorder. SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access, and Recovery (SOAR) is a model that can help.

Webinar - Legal Issues in Today’s Jail: Use of Force

The use of force is one of the leading areas of litigation in corrections. Understanding and articulating the legal requirements is critical in determining whether the force was objectively reasonable (pretrial inmates) or was applied in a good faith effort to maintain and restore order (convicted inmates). This webinar will review the leading Supreme Court decisions in the area of use of force, focusing on the report writing instrument used by both the deputy involved in the force and also as a tool in reviewing the use of force regardless of the inmate’s status.

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