Prosecutors

PT101 Introduction to Cybercrime Units for Prosecutors

This course provides an overview of the actions investigators can take at the outset of a financial crime investigation. Students learn to ask critical questions, gather documentation, and analyze information for leads. Topics include obtaining and working with financial records, red flags in financial cases, money laundering, investigative strategies for different types of financial crimes, and commingled funds.

CI240 Intermediate Cyber Investigations: Virtual Currency

This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge and skills they need to investigate crimes involving virtual currency. Instructors explain foundational concepts like the characteristics of money, virtual currency, and cryptocurrency. Blockchain technology, proof work, and proof of stake are covered; and students learn how industry-leading cryptocurrencies (Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Monero) work and how they differ from each other. Finally, students learn investigative techniques for tracking and documenting transactions; and best practices for seizing and securing cryptocurrency.

*Virtual currency basics. History of money and of virtual currency. Categorizing virtual currency.
*Blockchain. History of the blockchain. Understanding different protocols.
*Cryptocurrencies in detail. Bitcoin, Ethereum, Monero and other privacy coins.
*Investigative techniques. Seizing virtual currency; tracking transactions through the blockchain; documenting investigative results.

FC203 Financial Investigations: Beyond the Basics

This three-day course covers the fundamentals of financial investigations and incorporates some of the more advanced processes that elevate an investigation. During this course, students will learn about investigative processes, practical tools, and sources of information necessary to plan and conduct financial investigations. The course begins with a description of the basic composition of elements within illicit financial networks and how they work to compromise legitimate business and financial sectors. Course material will describe government, regulatory, and investigative actions within the United States, and by international partners to detect and investigate illicit actors and networks. The course also includes considerations for investigation planning and promotion of creative thinking.

CI101 Basic Cyber Investigations: Digital Footprints

This course introduces learners to the concept of digital footprints and best practices in protecting personally identifiable information (PII). Topics include limiting an individuals digital footprint, protecting privacy on social media, and the consequences of oversharing personal information; as well as steps to take after becoming a target of doxing.

*Current landscape. Emerging technology and trends that can aid criminals in the commission of identity theft, credit card theft, child exploitation, and production of counterfeit documents.
*Personally identifiable information (PII). Learn what PII is, why it can threaten individuals safety, and the scams and exploits criminals use to obtain it.
*Minimizing your digital footprint. Learn how and why you should remove PII, and how to find where information may be located. Instructors demonstrate how to secure digital devices and request removal of data from a website.
*Social media. Use security and privacy settings to control the amount of available information on multiple platforms.
*Resources. Identify resources that can help victims of identity theft, doxing, and other related crimes.

FC101 Financial Investigations Practical Skills

This course provides hands-on investigative training at a basic level. Students develop the practical skills, insight, and knowledge necessary to manage a successful financial investigation from start to finish, including the acquisition and examination of financial records, interview skills, and case management and organization. Additional topics include forgery and embezzlement, financial exploitation of the elderly, working with spreadsheets, financial profiling, and state-specific statutes and legal issues.

*Emerging issues. Current trends in various types of financial crimes. Recent cases and their implications.
*Financial records. Learn to obtain and manage bank records, including basic spreadsheeting skills.
*Working with data. Extract leads and draw conclusions from bank records and other financial data.
*Hands-on experience. Work a mock financial case as part of an investigative team.

FC110 Financial Crimes Against Seniors

This course promotes a multi-agency approach to the problem of financial exploitation of senior citizens. Bringing together law enforcement personnel and adult protective services investigators, the course enhances students investigative skills and interviewing techniques while facilitating networking and cooperation that can extend out of the classroom and into real cases. Topics include recognizing elder abuse, working with victims, identifying perpetrators, and resources for investigation and community awareness. Students work together to conduct a mock investigation into a hypothetical case.

*Financial investigation basics. What constitutes elder abuse? Family and trusted persons as perpetrators. Statutes and sentencing enhancements.
*Senior victims. Reasons for vulnerability. Special needs like Alzheimers or dementia.
*Resources. Community awareness and investigative resources.
*Hands-on experience. Work a case as part of an investigative team.

FC200 Intermediate Level Spreadsheeting Skills: Assessing and Organizing Data

This intermediate spreadsheeting course uses Microsoft Excel to assess and organize data in an electronic format. The class is designed for learners who have experience using Excel and who want to increase their spreadsheeting knowledge and skills. Topics include text functions, absolute referencing, date and time functions, flash fill, handling formula errors, VLOOKUP, dynamic arrays, and data validation. The course combines live demonstrations, instructor-led exercises, and independent student exercises.

IA103 Introduction to Strategic Intelligence Analysis

This course introduces analysts to the broader concepts of connecting the dots through link analysis. A critical portion of conducting a successful analytical investigation is the ability to link together and understand the complexities of the connectedness between people and organizations. Introduction to Link Analysis (ILA) expands on the basic principles of link and association analyses explored in the Foundations of Intelligence Analysis Training (FIAT) while building a framework for more advanced methods such as social network analysis.

Expanding basic knowledge of link and association analysis
Explaining the process of social network analysis
Understanding the visual mapping and mathematical components associated with link and social network analyses

FC203 Financial Investigations: Beyond the Basics

This three-day course covers the fundamentals of financial investigations and incorporates some of the more advanced processes that elevate an investigation. During this course, students will learn about investigative processes, practical tools, and sources of information necessary to plan and conduct financial investigations. The course begins with a description of the basic composition of elements within illicit financial networks and how they work to compromise legitimate business and financial sectors. Course material will describe government, regulatory, and investigative actions within the United States, and by international partners to detect and investigate illicit actors and networks. The course also includes considerations for investigation planning and promotion of creative thinking.

Ghost Guns: Past, Present, and Future

The NYPDs Major Case Field Intelligence Team is responsible for investigations related to Ghost Guns in New York City. The team has been conducting these investigations for nearly four years and have developed several proactive investigative models in conjunction with their partners in the Manhattan District Attorneys Office. During this presentation, attendees will be taught the basics on ghost guns and the various ways that they can be manufactured. That first portion of the presentation will lead into a discussion on what would be involved in starting up a proactive Ghost Gun investigative program. Finally, Manhattan Ghost Gun prosecutor ADA Bonnie Seok from the Manhattan District Attorneys Office will discuss the general topic from a prosecutors point of view and speak about some of the success stories her office has had working with the Major Case Team.

Presented by:

Bonnie Seok, Assistant District Attorney

John Uske, Detective, New York Police Department
Michael Billotto, Detective, New York Police Department

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