Mental Health Providers

Webinar – “Diverting People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities from the Criminal Justice System”

People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (sometimes known as I/DD) are an often overlooked population in the criminal justice system because of a lack of identification, understanding, and service gaps that prevent providers’ abilities to address their needs. Criminal justice professionals looking to effectively divert people in this population from the justice system can look to this webinar for strategies and tips on diversion, with an additional focus on people who have co-occurring I/DD, substance use disorders, and mental illnesses.

Webinar: Examining the Relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Substance Use among Tribal Populations

Examine the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and substance use, with an emphasis on research specific to tribal communities and youth. Discuss the confounding effects of social economic factors and ethnicity-based differences in prevalence rates. Review culturally enhanced treatment options for ACEs. Explore specific strategies for caregivers, prevention specialists, treatment providers, criminal justice professionals, and community members. Upon completion of this webinar, participants will be able to: 

  • Summarize research on the prevalence of ACEs among Native American/Alaska Native youth. 
  • Explain the relationship between social economic factors, ethnicity-based differences, and prevalence rates. 
  • Identify culturally-enhanced treatment options for ACEs.
  • Describe specific strategies to increase positive outcomes for youth impacted by ACEs.

Webinar: Building Stress-Resilient Tribal Communities

Review stress factors, the toxic stress of poverty, and the protective nature of community on stress resilience. Discuss the generational impact on stress resilience. Explore the predictive quality of social and community support on building stress resilience and stress management and reduction strategies. Upon completion of this webinar, participants will be able to:

Webinar: Social Emotional Skill Development

Social and emotional development can be defined as a process through which individuals acquire skills to increase self-awareness, improve relationships with others, and achieve their goals. These skills are essential to succeed in family, school, workplaces, and communities and are increasingly recognized as important to one’s success in a variety of life outcomes. The benefits of social and emotional skill development can therefore be leveraged in tribal communities to maximize the protective impact of these skills against negative outcomes, including addiction. Attend this webinar to discuss the importance of social emotional skills (SES) among children, youth and adults and the buffering effect of SES on addiction and trauma. Examine strategies to support SES development. Upon completion of this webinar, participants will be able to: 

  • Summarize how social emotional skill development occurs at various ages 
  • Explain the impact of SES on addiction and trauma 
  • Identify four specific strategies to support SES development

Webinar: Examining the Relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Substance Use among Tribal Populations

Examine the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and substance use, with an emphasis on research specific to tribal communities and youth. Discuss the confounding effects of social economic factors and ethnicity-based differences in prevalence rates. Review culturally enhanced treatment options for ACEs. Explore specific strategies for caregivers, prevention specialists, treatment providers, criminal justice professionals, and community members.

Upon completion of this webinar, you will be able to:

Webinar: Strategies to Reduce Underage Substance Abuse in Tribal Communities

Examine key predictors of underaged substance abuse. Discuss the long-term impact of underaged substance use, prevalence rates among tribal communities, and strategies to reduce or delay underaged substance use in tribal communities.

Upon completion of this webinar, you will be able to:

  • List key predictors of underaged substance use
  • Explain the critical importance of delaying use
  • Identify skills and strategies specific to tribal communities in reducing underage substance use

Webinar – “Implementing a Peer Mentor Program: Strategies for Engaging Peer Recovery Support Specialists in Adult Treatment Courts”

Peer Recovery Support Specialists (PRSSs) working in treatment courts are people with lived experience of behavioral health disorders and criminal justice involvement who are key members of the clinical team serving those participating in drug court and mental health court programs.

This webinar covers strategies for how to engage PRSSs in adult treatment courts to support people with substance use disorders and co-occurring mental disorders. Topics covered will include:

Webinar: “Trauma—Getting off the Emotional X”

Most officers know the expression “get off the X,” the idea that remaining in one spot during a gunfight cannot only be dangerous, it can be deadly. This webinar will assist participants in addressing the after-effects of job exposure to violence. “Getting off the emotional X” (a phrase coined by Dr. Olivia Johnson) is the idea that staying in a place of emotional conflict and turmoil can increase the likelihood of negative outcomes. Operating in this emotionally turbulent state can become habitual.

Webinar – “Cognitive Behavioral Treatment: Recognizing Criminal Thinking Patterns”

This webinar will address why cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) that addresses criminal thinking is important in addition to CBT programming that addresses substance use disorder for individuals involved in the criminal legal system.

Webinar: “How to Respond Effectively to People with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities in the Criminal Justice System”

People with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) are an often overlooked population in the criminal justice system because of a lack of identification and understanding and service gaps that prevent providers’ abilities to address their needs. At the same time, they are also often victimized by people without I/DD, which can sometimes lead to sustained involvement with the criminal justice system.

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