Law Enforcement

DF330 Advanced Digital Forensic Analysis: iOS & Android

This course provides the advanced skills and knowledge necessary to analyze data on iOS devices (iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad) and Android devices at an advanced level. Students use forensically-sound tools and techniques to analyze potential evidence, employing advanced techniques to uncover evidence potentially missed or misrepresented by commercial forensic tools. Topics include identifying potential threats to data stored on devices, available acquisition options, accessing locked devices, and the default folder structure. Core skills include analyzing artifacts such as device information, call history, voicemail, messages, web browser history, contacts, and photos. Instruction is provided on developing the hunt methodology for analyzing third party applications not supported by commercial forensic tools.

Mobile device hardware fundamentals. How mobile devices work, store data, and interact with a variety of networks.
Device handling. Properly preserving data for imaging and analysis. Identifying potential threats to data integrity.
Device acquisition and security. Acquisition options (physical, logical, device backups). Bypassing passcodes and properly defeating encrypted backups of iOS devices.
Advanced analysis techniques. Mounting images, partitioning scheme and default folder structure, types of artifacts (plists, SQLite databases, etc.).

DF310 Advanced Digital Forensic Analysis: Windows

This course covers the identification and extraction of artifacts associated with the Microsoft Windows operating system. Topics include the Change Journal, BitLocker, and a detailed examination of the various artifacts found in each of the Registry hive files. Students also examine Event Logs, Volume Shadow Copies, link files, and thumbnails. This course uses a mixture of lecture, discussion, demonstration, and hands-on exercises.

IA101 Foundations of Intelligence Analysis Training

This course addresses the critical need for well-trained intelligence analysts to interpret growing amounts of information. Topics include the intelligence cycle, analytical thinking skills, the importance of strategic analysis, communication and social media analysis, recommendation development, and legal and ethical issues. Students work hands-on with specialized software to synthesize information and develop various products of intelligence. The course was developed by a consortium that included NW3C, Law Enforcement Intelligence Units (LEIU), the International Association of Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysis (IALEIA), and the Regional Information Sharing System (RISS).

*Analysis basics. History and purpose of intelligence analysis. Legal issues and ethics. Sources of information. The intelligence cycle.
*Types of analysis. Crime patterns. Associations. Flow. Communications. Financial analysis.
*Creative and critical thinking. Brainstorming. Mind mapping. Steps to critical thinking.
*Deterring crime. Strategic analysis as a tool for law enforcement personnel.
*Hands-on experience. Work as part of a team to analyze information pertaining to several hypothetical cases.

FC102 Tools and Techniques for Financial Investigations

This course provides an overview of the actions investigators can take at the outset of a financial crime investigation. Students learn to ask critical questions, gather documentation, and analyze information for leads. Topics include obtaining and working with financial records, red flags in financial cases, money laundering, investigative strategies for different types of financial crimes, and commingled funds.

IA101 Foundations of Intelligence Analysis Training

This course addresses the critical need for well-trained intelligence analysts to interpret growing amounts of information. Topics include the intelligence cycle, analytical thinking skills, the importance of strategic analysis, communication and social media analysis, recommendation development, and legal and ethical issues. Students work hands-on with specialized software to synthesize information and develop various products of intelligence. The course was developed by a consortium that included NW3C, Law Enforcement Intelligence Units (LEIU), the International Association of Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysis (IALEIA), and the Regional Information Sharing System (RISS).

*Analysis basics. History and purpose of intelligence analysis. Legal issues and ethics. Sources of information. The intelligence cycle.
*Types of analysis. Crime patterns. Associations. Flow. Communications. Financial analysis.
*Creative and critical thinking. Brainstorming. Mind mapping. Steps to critical thinking.
*Deterring crime. Strategic analysis as a tool for law enforcement personnel.
*Hands-on experience. Work as part of a team to analyze information pertaining to several hypothetical cases.

FC101 Financial Investigations Practical Skills

This course provides hands-on investigative training at a basic level. Students develop the practical skills, insight, and knowledge necessary to manage a successful financial investigation from start to finish, including the acquisition and examination of financial records, interview skills, and case management and organization. Additional topics include forgery and embezzlement, financial exploitation of the elderly, working with spreadsheets, financial profiling, and state-specific statutes and legal issues.

*Emerging issues. Current trends in various types of financial crimes. Recent cases and their implications.
*Financial records. Learn to obtain and manage bank records, including basic spreadsheeting skills.
*Working with data. Extract leads and draw conclusions from bank records and other financial data.
*Hands-on experience. Work a mock financial case as part of an investigative team.

IA105 Intelligence Writing and Briefing

This course covers basic intelligence writing and briefing principles as well as methods for effective and clear intelligence sharing. Topics covered include creative and critical thinking, critical reading skills, source evaluation, privacy and civil rights, intelligence writing style and structure, and generating and presenting intelligence briefings. With guidance from experienced experts, students gain hands-on experience by working through data sets based on real cases to produce intelligence products. Instructors and peers provide feedback on briefings and reports produced and presented in class.

*Foundational skills. Creative thinking. Critical thinking. Critical reading.
*Information sources. Identify sources of intelligence information. Evaluate sources for validity and reliability.
*Analytical reports. Develop a structured and actionable analytical report based on a data set given in class.
*Privacy considerations. Ensure protection of privacy and civil rights while producing intelligence products.
*Briefings. Construct and deliver an intelligence briefing based on a data set given in class.

FC099 Basic Level Spreadsheeting Skills

This one-day course provides foundational spreadsheeting knowledge and skills to enhance workplace productivity. The course covers basic navigation of Microsoft Excel by combining live demonstrations and hands-on exercises.

Work with multiple worksheets within a workbook
Hide, unhide, and protect worksheets
Adjust rows and columns
Use copy and paste options
Find, select, and sort data

FC102 Tools and Techniques for Financial Investigations

This course provides an overview of the actions investigators can take at the outset of a financial crime investigation. Students learn to ask critical questions, gather documentation, and analyze information for leads. Topics include obtaining and working with financial records, red flags in financial cases, money laundering, investigative strategies for different types of financial crimes, and commingled funds.

FC111 Financial Crimes Against Seniors Seminar

This course promotes a multi-agency approach to the problem of financial exploitation of senior citizens. Topics include working with senior victims, examining documents like bank records and power of attorney, and resources for investigation and community awareness. Detailed examination of a case study from initial complaint to prosecution reinforces and illustrates the course content. With a dual focus on financial abuse by trusted persons and common scams aimed at seniors, the course introduces senior-specific investigative skills while facilitating networking and cooperation that can extend out of the classroom and into real cases.

Pages